No More Sleepless Nights - Breast Cancer

The No More Sleepless Nights program, developed by Dr. Michael J. Schultz at the Breast Center at UM St. Joseph Medical Center, offers a fast track to treatment to help alleviate fear.

Women are scheduled the day they call us with an abnormal mammogram or lump. Within 24 hours women can receive the results of a biopsy so that they can start putting together a treatment plan with our expert team of physicians.

The program reduces a typically lengthy period to just a day. The services include:

  • Additional views, ultrasound
  • Consultation with breast surgeon
  • Biopsy if needed
  • Results and follow-up consultation usually within 24 hours
  • Availability of full diagnostic evaluation
  • Expert treatment, multidisciplinary approach

The Breast Center also offers a high risk breast cancer screening program to help identify patients that are at a higher risk level for developing breast cancer in their lifetime. The Breast Center team works with individuals that are found to be at high risk to establish routine monitoring and identify risk-reduction strategies.

Take an online risk assessment now or call 877-833-6529 for more information.

Customized Breast Cancer Treatment

One Thanksgiving, Carolyn Bublitz had a breast biopsy on Wednesday and waited the entire holiday weekend for results from a facility that was not UM St. Joseph Medical Center. “My family and I spent the holiday worried,” recalls Bublitz. Her abnormal mammogram and additional breast studies had already taken weeks.

She received her breast cancer diagnosis on Tuesday, and a friend immediately recommended Dr. Michael Schultz, director of UM St. Joseph’s Breast Center. Dr. Schultz saw her the very next day.

Her breast cancer turned out to be somewhat complicated, requiring an extensive work-up and evaluation. “I had two different kinds of cancer tumors in both breasts,” she explains.

At UM St. Joseph’s Cancer Institute, each patient is presented at a conference where all the experts—surgeon, oncologist, radiation oncologist, radiologist, pathologist, plastic surgeon and nurse navigator—discuss each patient and customize a treatment plan.

Although Bublitz could have had a bilateral mastectomy with reconstruction, Schultz explains, “After additional consultations with Carolyn, we came up with a unique paradigm, much better tailored to her specific needs. By utilizing a novel approach in which chemotherapy is given prior to surgery, we offered Carolyn lumpectomies—breast conservation type surgery.”

“Following completion of chemotherapy, she was ready for surgery, avoiding mastectomy,” says Schultz. “I got superb results from the chemo, which shrunk the tumors,” she adds. Her surgery will be followed by radiation treatment and nine months of Herceptin therapy.

“I don’t mind driving up and down the Beltway to St. Joseph,” says Bublitz, who lives in Columbia, Md. “My confidence in St. Joe’s team is well-deserved!”